Low-T and Coronavirus

That rumbling sound you hear is herds of men with low testosterone running like mad to at least one of the 3 following places after reading this article on the connection between low testosterone and coronavirus.


1. Their local store for a steak to replace their soy milk.
2. A gym that has heavy weights.
3. A sympathetic doctor willing to prescribe TRT.

Health is the New Wealth

Even though the pandemic curve is starting to flatten, the new reality of life will be a heightened sensitivity to the cost of poor health and the value of good health.

And, like anything with value, it becomes sought after and marketed.

The cost of poor health has been clearly identified both in terms of the overall death rate from Covid-19 (over 50,000 as of the time of writing this post) as well as to who is dying from it (people with inflammatory issues due to diabetes, damaged lungs from smoking or pollution, and general obesity). I would have added age as a risk factor until this guy proved me wrong.

The impacts from both our current epidemic of bad health choices plus now this pandemic and future ones, highlight the immense cost of being unhealthy as well as the great value of being healthy.

By health I don’t mean necessarily six-pack abs and a bright smile fit for Instagram (although that indicates a controlled diet and good dental hygiene which is no mean feat), but it does mean a lifestyle where one makes better choices around their eating habits, how they socialize, and how they spend their time.

These choices make for healthy people and, from a societal and business perspective, those are the people who come with more assets and lower costs. For employers that means a person who shows up to work and can be a productive member of the team. For life outside work, that means a potential life partner who won’t be a burden on someone who cares for them.

If the 2008 financial crisis led to people inquiring about the debt burden of a potential partner, the Covid pandemic will lead to people inquiring about a person’s health before getting into a relationship.

Nature is a predator and predators always go after the weak. It thins the herd which improves the environment for those that remain. So put down that vape pen, take a run, and get to bed on time. Your choices matter more than they ever did before.

Twitching

Mark Twight said it a long time ago (when places like record stores existed) and that cold hard truth remains the same. Read this and then think about it when you go to work, smiling at the inane jokes from your co-workers, rehashing the details of the game of your favorite form of “sportsball”, and just pretending to care when you really don’t.

“You’re haunted because you remember having something more. With each drag of the razor you ask yourself why you piss your blood into another man’s cup. Working at the job he offered, your future is between his thumb and forefinger. And the necessary accessories, the proclamations of success you thought gave you stability provide your boss security. Your debt encourages acquiescence, the heavy mortgage makes you polite.”

Intrigued? Read more here. Better yet read it and then change your life. Uproot it and replant it before you run out of time. Do the things that you care about. Study, train, and get it done.

 

 

Choices: Occupation or Liberation

Choices are easily made, or unmade. Sometimes we just let events, ennui, or fear, make choices for us. The results of these non-decisions are uniformly bad and they create a cascade of events that serve as stark reminders (punishments) that appear in our lives.

These reminders exist as little insurgents, draining resources and blunting efforts to be free. The longer they last, the harder it is to remove them. Let them last long enough and it will take a herculean effort to be rid of them.

This CIA handbook on how to fight an occupation with slow and deliberate acts (long meetings, rigid emphasis on useless details, etc.) is illustrates the failure to act and make the right pre-emptive choices.

So, no matter what, act on Hamlet’s questions to himself and “take up arms against a sea of troubles and, by opposing, end them.”

Make the choice, fight the hard fight. The clock is ticking and liberation pulls further from view every day that we don’t fight.